About Three Acres

Why we do it, how we do it & what we do.

Why do you build Shopify Stores?

To inspire and assist people to pursue their own business so that together, we can take ownership of our work, have pride in it and support our families. But there is a little more to it than that.

We believe there is nothing more satisfying than building your own business, your livelihood, with all of your talents and determination. There are always “ups” and “downs” but in the end you can be proud of what you’ve accomplished.

We believe in you and your business – and Shopify does too.

Our Process

 

While every project is different, there are some things that stay the same. We follow a simple 3 step process when approaching any project.

  1. Planning
  2. Production
  3. Delivery

In the planning stage we’ll work directly with you and your team to learn about your business. We want to know everything that will help us make the best recommendations. It’s important to us that we only recommend the solutions that work for you and not oversell. Once we have that understanding, we’ll put together a proposal that outlines the solutions, timeline and cost for your project.

In the production stage, we put our recommendations into action and work with you to develop your project. Keeping you connected to the work through regular updates and live previews ensures that the direction we originally decided on continues to be what you need.

Delivery sounds like we’re giving you a nice little package that you need to unwrap when we’re gone. That’s not the case, the delivery stage isn’t the end, it’s just the last stage of the project. We prefer to create long lasting partnerships with our clients and we start that off with a 30 day support window at the end of the project. We’ll help you launch your project, and if any bugs or issues come up inside the support window – we’re there to help.

Don’t worry, we also offer training & retainer options if you need ongoing work.

 

Why did you choose “Three Acres”?

 

This isn’t a quick answer, but it’s an important part of what we’re trying to accomplish with Three Acres. To understand why we choose this name, you have to understand something else first.

There is an economic model that was popularized in the 1920’s called Distributism. Fundamentally it’s a criticism of both Capitalism and Socialism. We believe this model is a good one, and we should work towards it. From the distributists point of view Capitalism is weak for both the employer and the employee. For the employer there is always another company who will make your product, or complete your service cheaper. For the employee, there is always someone else willing to take your job for less.

Distributism says that the productive assets of society should be widely owned, this doesn’t mean everyone owns everything, like communism, but instead that a person should be able to own the thing that supports them. It also means that anything that centralizes these productive assets is not good. Think of Walmart, Amazon or any other global brand. These companies continually outsource their products, charge large commission from hardworking businesses and then refuse to even pay their own employees a living wage, let alone enough to properly support their families.

The distributists knows that it’s the small business that supports our society. 

This is where Shopify comes in. Here is their mission statement:

Making commerce better for everyone

We help people achieve independence by making it easier to start, run, and grow a business. We believe the future of commerce has more voices, not fewer, so we’re reducing the barriers to business ownership to make commerce better for everyone.

Enabling more people to own their work, to start their businesses, in a way that gives them independence. That’s why we build Shopify sites.

The name Three Acres was taken from a popular slogan used for Distributism,  “Every man should own three acres and a cow” Which is the idea that every person should own the thing that supports them.

We didn’t think “And a cow” made a great name, so we settled on Three Acres.